"Diversity, Harmony, Community - Together WE can make a difference!”

Gresham Farmers Market 2020: Sat, Aug 22, 2020 8:30AM-2PM

08/22/2020 - 8:30am
08/22/2020 - 2:00pm
Etc/GMT-8
Gresham Farmers Market 2020: Sat, Aug 22, 2020 8:30AM-2PM. Saturday's thru October. Info here!

Saturday's thru October

When: Sat, Aug 22, 2020 8:30AM-2PM
Where: Arts Plaza
NE 3rd Street and NE Hood Avenue
Get Map!

Oregon's Stay Home, Save Lives order allows farmers markets to operate. The Gresham Farmers' Market will open for the season with a limited number of vendors and strict COVID-19 physical distancing and safety measures in place.

At the market safety measures

  • Do not visit the market if you you are feeling unwell.
  • Only one person per household should visit the market.
  • Wear a mask.
  • Bring a shopping list.
  • Stay at least 6 feet away from anyone not in your household.
  • No socializing in the market for now.
  • Do not touch items before buying.
  • Shop quickly.
  • No dogs; service animals only.

Visit the Gresham Farmers' Market website for more information.

Free Basic Bike Repair: Aug 23: Sun, Aug 23, 2020 1PM-5PM

08/23/2020 - 1:00pm
08/23/2020 - 5:00pm
Etc/GMT-8
Free Basic Bike Repair: Aug 23: Sun, Aug 23, 2020 1PM-5PM. Coho Picnic Shelter, Main City Park. Info here!

When: Sun, Aug 23, 2020 1PM-5PM
Where: Coho Picnic Shelter
Main City Park
219 South Main Ave.
Get Map!

The non-profit organization Bikes for Humanity is offering free basic bike repairs. Outdoor, socially-distanced repairs will happen near the Coho picnic shelter.

You can also donate old bikes to be fixed up for those in need.

For more information about this event, contact Andrew at Bikes for Humanity at 503-496-9641.

City of Gresham Music Mondays 2020: Mon, Aug 24, 2020 7PM-8PM

08/24/2020 - 7:00pm
08/24/2020 - 8:00pm
Etc/GMT-8
City of Gresham Music Mondays 2020: Mon, Aug 24, 2020 7PM-8PM. Online event. Info here!

When: Mon, Aug 24, 2020 7PM-8PM
Where: Online event

Gresham's Center for the Arts Foundation presents the annual free Music Mondays concert series on Monday evenings in July and August.

In collaboration with MetroEast Community Media, this year's concerts will come to you via live streaming.

How to watch and listen

Concerts will be streamed online:

Performance schedule

To celebrate the 11th anniversary during this challenging time, we bring you an amazing list of local musicians.

  • July 6 - Timothy James: 2019 Music Monday favorite of R&B and blues
  • July 13 - Sonny Hess Band: Female-driven blues
  • July 20 - Kaloku and the Krew: Hawaiian Reggae
  • July 27 - Rich Layton & Tough Town: Texas-style blues
  • August 3 - Bobby & Friends: Country through the years
  • August 10 - Bayou Boyz: Zydeco sounds
  • August 17 - Remedy: Classic rock through the 70s, 80s and 90s
  • August 24 - Mosaique: Featuring torch and jazz vocalist Thea Enos
  • August 31 - Patrick Lamb: Portland touring star in pop, blues and contemporary jazz

Thank you to sponsors: Weston Kia, Clackamas County Bank, Michael McKeel DMD, KMO Real Estate and City of Gresham for helping to bring the resources together for the virtual programming.

For more information, contact the Center for the Arts Foundation at centerartsfoundation@gmail.com or Sue O'Halloran at 503-489-1157.

City of Gresham Planning Commission Meeting: Mon, Aug 24, 2020 6:30PM-8:30PM

08/24/2020 - 6:30pm
08/24/2020 - 8:30pm
Etc/GMT-8
City of Gresham Planning Commission Meeting: Mon, Aug 24, 2020 6:30PM-8:30PM. Get involved, Make a difference. Info here!

Get involved, Make a difference

When: Mon, Aug 24, 20206:30PM-8:30PM
Where: Gresham City Hall
Council Chambers
1333 NW Eastman Pky
Get Map!

The Planning Commission advises City Council on long-range, comprehensive planning and land use issues within the city.

For more information about this event, contact Amanda Lunsford, Administrative Analyst at 503-618-2235 or Amanda.Lunsford@GreshamOregon.gov.

Policy Development Meeting: Tue, Aug 25, 2020 10AM-11AM

08/25/2020 - 10:00am
08/25/2020 - 11:00am
Etc/GMT-8
Policy Development Meeting: Tue, Aug 25, 2020 10AM-11AM. Online meeting via Zoom. Info here!

Get Involved. Make a Difference

When: Tue, Aug 25, 2020 10AM-11AM
Where: Online meeting via Zoom

Policy Development meetings are informal sessions to review programs, receive progress reports on programs or projects, or to receive other information from staff. The Council periodically holds policy development meetings jointly with citizen advisory committees to discuss policy issues.

For more information contact the City Recorder's Office at 503-618-2697.

Read more about Council meetings.

City of Gresham Music Mondays 2020: Mon, Aug 31, 2020 7PM-8PM

08/31/2020 - 7:00pm
08/31/2020 - 8:00pm
Etc/GMT-8
City of Gresham Music Mondays 2020: Mon, Aug 31, 2020 7PM-8PM. Online event. Info here!

When: Mon, Aug 31, 2020 7PM-8PM
Where: Online event

Gresham's Center for the Arts Foundation presents the annual free Music Mondays concert series on Monday evenings in July and August.

In collaboration with MetroEast Community Media, this year's concerts will come to you via live streaming.

How to watch and listen

Concerts will be streamed online:

Performance schedule

To celebrate the 11th anniversary during this challenging time, we bring you an amazing list of local musicians.

  • July 6 - Timothy James: 2019 Music Monday favorite of R&B and blues
  • July 13 - Sonny Hess Band: Female-driven blues
  • July 20 - Kaloku and the Krew: Hawaiian Reggae
  • July 27 - Rich Layton & Tough Town: Texas-style blues
  • August 3 - Bobby & Friends: Country through the years
  • August 10 - Bayou Boyz: Zydeco sounds
  • August 17 - Remedy: Classic rock through the 70s, 80s and 90s
  • August 24 - Mosaique: Featuring torch and jazz vocalist Thea Enos
  • August 31 - Patrick Lamb: Portland touring star in pop, blues and contemporary jazz

Thank you to sponsors: Weston Kia, Clackamas County Bank, Michael McKeel DMD, KMO Real Estate and City of Gresham for helping to bring the resources together for the virtual programming.

For more information, contact the Center for the Arts Foundation at centerartsfoundation@gmail.com or Sue O'Halloran at 503-489-1157.

Senior Healthy Hikers, Lookout Mountain Hike: Tue, Aug 25, 2020 10AM-5PM

08/25/2020 - 10:00am
08/25/2020 - 5:00pm
Etc/GMT-8
SSenior Healthy Hikers, Lookout Mountain Hike: Tue, Aug 25, 2020 10AM-5PM Let's Go Walking!. Info here!

Let's Go Walking!

When: Tue, Aug 25, 2020 10AM-5PM
Where: Meet at trailhead
Get Map!

Hiking during COVID-19 pandemic

  • All participants must wear facial masks and practice social distancing during Senior Healthy Hikers group events.
  • We will no longer carpool to the trailhead. Participants are responsible for their own transportation.
  • Driving directions (with the beginning point at Gresham City Hall) will be distributed at least three days prior to the event.

Hike details

  • Distance: 2.9 miles
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Elevation gain: 565 feet
  • Trail conditions: Packed dirt, rocky in places
  • Round-trip travel: Approximately 125 miles

This hike starts at the 6,525-foot level, so there could be snow patches on the trail. The hike climbs through subalpine meadows to the scarp of Lookout Mountain, then follows the shoulder of the peak through stunted forests until reaching open slopes, rock pinnacles, and expansive views of Mount Hood. At the summit, on a clear day, views of Mt. Jefferson and the Three Sisters are visible to the east, and Mt. Rainier to the north.

Plan to bring water and snacks, along with a sack lunch to enjoy at the summit. Wear good hiking shoes and sunscreen or a hat for the sun, since there is no tree cover at the top. Hiking poles could be helpful, but not necessary.

For more information about this hike please contact Mary Ann Buck at 971-344-1946 or buckbanter@gmail.com.

Senior Healthy Hikers asks that participants be 50 or older. A couple wishing to hike is welcome if one member of the couple is 50 or better.

Pets are not permitted on our hikes or walks.

Senior Healthy Hikers member guidelines

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Summer 2020 Newsletter here!

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Summer 2020 Newsletter here! Wilkes East Neighborhood, Gresham Oregon USA. Diversity, Harmony, Community- Together 'WE' can make a difference.

2020 Summer Newsletter

"Diversity, Harmony, Community -
Together 'WE' can make a difference!”


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Read it now!

Summer 2020 Newsletter

Inside This Issue:

  • An Inclusive Neighborhood
  • Columbia View Park Concept
  • Nature-Deficit Disorder
  • Coping During the Pandemic
  • Importance of Our Parks
  • Albertina Kerr Housing Update

Download your copy here. (includes active web links)

Newsletters are a regular publication of the Wilkes East Neighborhood Association. They are hand-delivered to over 1,500 residences and businesses in our area 3 times per year, timed to correspond with our regular meetings.

View archive   |   Policy & Ad Rates

Got a story or tip to share?
Wilkes East residents are encouraged to submit articles and tips for the newsletter. Articles should be limited to 300-500 words and may be subject to editing Include a related photo. Send by email to chair@wilkeseastna.org, or by postal mail to: 17104 NE Oregon St • Portland OR 97230.

Volunteers Needed
Newsletters are hand-delivered to Wilkes East residents and businesses by neighborhood volunteers. There are always routes that need delivery people. Routes are small and many. We can always use your help.
To volunteer contact chair@wilkeseastna.org.

Building An Inclusive Neighborhood Starts With Antiracism

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Building An Inclusive Neighborhood Starts With Antiracism

Sarah Jacobson, Board member

The recent deaths of Breonna Taylor, Ahmad Arbery and George Floyd, along with weeks of subsequent protests, have shined a national spotlight on racism in America. It has left a lot of us wondering “What is my role and responsibility in perpetuating or dismantling racism? How can I help? How can I reduce harm?”

If you are asking yourself these questions, you are not alone. Acknowledging racism exists is easy, but dismantling it is hard. Racism is more than individual prejudices but a society wide dynamic that occurs, often unintentionally, at a group level. There is no easy or quick fix here. It will take a lot of work to remove the systems of oppression that we have created over centuries and be able to heal and move forward as a country. This work begins at home.

Whether you are an activist with a robust plan to address racial equity or someone who is just coming to terms with the true extent of racism in our country, there is an opportunity to create a more inclusive neighborhood right here. Everyone deserves the right to feel safe in their home and their community, but the reality is, not everyone does. So, what can we do to change that? Below are three suggestions to start creating a more inclusive neighborhood.

Know Your Neighbor
If you have attended a local Race Talks, led by retired PPS teacher and administrator Donna Maxey, you already know one of the best ways to create inclusion in your neighborhood is to know your neighbors. Not just know their name but KNOW them. Maxey recommends starting with the three neighbors on either side of you and on both sides of the street. That is approximately 12 neighbors!

While I talk to my neighbors pretty regularly, the recent COVID-19 lockdown made me realize I had very few of their phone numbers. This was a wake-up call for me that I didn’t know my neighbors as well as I would like. Of course, we are currently facing the added challenge of ongoing social distancing, but try to get out and connect with neighbors while maintaining healthy boundaries.

Avoid Assumptions
We are all influenced by our life experiences and our world at large. We have all received subtle, and sometimes not so subtle, messages about what skin color means in our society. Because this messaging is constantly being thrown at us through the media, it takes a lot of work to mitigate the effect and undo negative thought patterns. It is important to actively avoid assumptions about other people because they are based on preconceived notions of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, religion and other layers of identity rather than facts. If you see someone in the neighborhood you don’t recognize, avoid making assumptions about who they are and why they are there. Remember that a stranger is only a stranger until you get to know them.

Connect Across Differences
We are naturally attracted to people with whom we share similarities. Similar age, family structure and outdoor hobbies can be a simple way to form a connection with a neighbor. These are all examples of surface level traits- things we can visually see about someone before we even get to know them. You have a boat, me too- let’s be friends! It is normal to connect based on surface level commonalities, however, creating an inclusive neighborhood means also intentionally connecting across differences. There are so many factors that make each of us the unique person we are and that is a beautiful part of the diverse community we live in. The more we learn about someone else below the surface, things we wouldn’t know just from appearances, the more we might find that we have in common. Don’t let surface level differences deter you from connecting with your neighbor.

Connection, community and sense of belonging are all important aspects of human nature. When we are able push our comfort zones just a little to create that new connection, we all benefit. Building an inclusive community isn’t about being a perfect neighbor, nobody is perfect. It is about accepting that nobody is perfect but everyone is worthy. As Dr. A. Katrise Perera, Gresham-Barlow Superintendent, recently said during Gresham’s Conversation on Race and Reconciliation, until we can say Black lives matter, we can’t say all lives matter. The more we can set aside our own unique story and understand our community at large, the better we can work towards equity and justice.

City of Gresham: Input on Columbia View Neighborhood Park’s Concept Plan

Tina Osterink, City of Gresham
Natural Resource Planner

In the spring of 2019, the City of Gresham began a process initiated by the City Council to identify potential recreation improvements for six undeveloped parks throughout the city. The parks identified for future improvements were two community parks and four neighborhood parks, including Columbia View Neighborhood Park.

This exploration of future improvements was initiated by the city to understand community desires for each park, capital costs for potential improvements, and maintenance needs if developed. Community feedback will help prioritize which park improvements will be implemented as funding becomes available.

Staff and a consultant team conducted on-site meetings, surveys and an open house throughout 2019. Community feedback was used to develop high level concept plans for all six undeveloped parks. The plans include a range of design and facility options for each park, including Columbia View Neighborhood Park.

Based on analysis of Columbia View’s unique existing conditions and feedback during public engagement meetings, the following concept plan was developed.

Columbia View neighborhood Park's Concept Plan
Columbia View Park's Concept Plan

Community feedback throughout 2019 noted opportunities for the park may include play structures for kids, designated off-leash dog areas, improved accessibility for all ages and abilities, education displays, and picnic areas. Constraints include maintenance, safety concerns, a lack of trash receptacles, and concerns with attracting too many people to neighborhood park. Additional feedback from nearby neighbors during a virtual meeting held in June 2020 is as follows:

  • Keep this neighborhood park in a natural state with limited upgrades.
  • Supportive of trails to improve access and a community garden but wanted staff to consider either eliminating the shelter and courts or at least move those items towards the school.
  • Consider natural long-lasting materials for an ADA perimeter path around the park.
  • Dog park located under chestnut trees hurt dog paws and in what is now informally known as “the fetch it zone”.
  • Some would prefer an off-leash area vs. fenced dog leash area.
  • Consider placing amenities closer to H.B. Lee Middle School but engage the school first.
  • Concern with picnic shelter location on upslope portion of park that interferes with backyard privacy and could contribute to real or perceived safety concerns.
  • Lack of police access into the SE portion of the park near potential amenity placement.
  • Further explore feasibility of providing secondary access off NE Pacific St.

During the June 2020 meeting, staff stressed the importance of balancing input from nearby neighbors with meeting the equity, opportunity and access needs for community members who live within the quarter-mile walking and biking service area.

Next steps in the outreach process include meeting with Community Based Organizations to gain their input on the concept plan for Columbia View Neighborhood Park, online review of the concept plan report from July 13 – August 31 and then convene on August 10 at the Wilkes East Neighborhood Association Meeting (online via Zoom).

Additional information can be found at the Parks Planning website and you can reach out to Tina Osterink at Tina.Osterink@GreshamOregon.Gov or by phone at (503) 618-2392.

Project website where the concept plans and draft report can be viewed: https://greshamoregon.gov/Parks-Planning/

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