"Diversity, Harmony, Community - Together WE can make a difference!”

Volunteer Opportunity at Nadaka Nature Park: Sep 28 - Nov 5, 2021

Volunteer Opportunity at Nadaka Nature Park: Sep 28 - Nov 5, 2021. etired, have a flexible schedule, want some exercise, need school credits? The City of Gresham is requesting volunteer. Info here!

Retired, have a flexible schedule, want some exercise, need school credits? The City of Gresham is requesting volunteer support to help manage trails and plant species in the forest at Nadaka Nature Park, 17550 NE Pacific St.

Work will be led by PGE interns and will include digging, pulling and pruning. Work will require use of shovels, loppers and wheelbarrows. Equipment and work gloves will be provided, we suggest you bring your own water bottle. Bring sturdy work shoes and clothing you’re comfortable working in, as we approach fall weather please ensure to come dressed for the weather.

Covid-19 protocols: Everyone must be wearing a mask at all times, unless more than 6ft away from others. Hand sanitizer will be provided. Volunteers will be required to complete an application and sign a waiver.

Volunteer schedule: Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 1:00pm-5:30pm, Thursdays and Fridays 10:00am-2:30pm

More Info?
Please email keri.handaly@GreshamOregon.gov to inquire/rsvp.

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Summer 2021 Newsletter here!

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Summer 2021 Newsletter here! Wilkes East Neighborhood, Gresham Oregon USA. Diversity, Harmony, Community- Together 'WE' can make a difference.

Summer 2021 Newsletter

"Diversity, Harmony, Community -
Together 'WE' can make a difference!”


alt=Read it now!

Summer 2021 Newsletter

Inside This Issue:

  • Trackers, Never Lose Stuff Again
  • New Special Needs Adult Program
  • Wilkes East Land-Use Update
  • Saving 267 Trees; Shaull Woods
  • Meet City Councilor Dina DiNucci

Download your copy here. (includes active web links)

Newsletters are a regular publication of the Wilkes East Neighborhood Association. They are hand-delivered to over 1,500 residences and businesses in our area 3 times per year, timed to correspond with our general meetings.

View archive   |   Policy & Ad Rates

Got a story or tip to share?
Wilkes East residents are encouraged to submit articles and tips for the newsletter. Articles should be limited to 300-400 words and may be subject to editing. Include a related photo. Send by email to chair@wilkeseastna.org, or by postal mail to: 17104 NE Oregon St • Portland OR 97230.

Volunteers Needed
Newsletters are hand-delivered to Wilkes East residents and businesses by neighborhood volunteers. There are always routes that need delivery people. Routes are small and many. We can always use your help.
To volunteer contact chair@wilkeseastna.org.

It’s going to be a scorcher! Potentially historic heatwave ahead for Jun 25-28, 2021

A weather update from WENA's in-house meteorologist, Garret Hartung: It’s going to be a scorcher this weekend, potentially historic heatwave ahead for June 25-28. Info here!

A weather update from WENA's in-house meteorologist, Garret Hartung:

As you might have heard by now, or seen on your favorite weather app/source, it’s gonna get hot this weekend. For the past several days, forecast models have been painting a dire picture for the PNW. An anomalously strong ridge of high pressure is looking to park itself over the Pacific Northwest over the weekend, paving the way for temperatures to meet or exceed records for the month of June, and potentially making a run at the hottest temperatures ever recorded in our region. For reference the highest temperature recorded in June for Portland is 102F, with the all time high temperature record being 107F. After Monday, temperatures look to calm down a bit and get back into the lower 90’s, but it will remain very dry.

So how hot will it actually get?
NWS Portland (at the time I’m writing this) is going with high temperatures at PDX of 104 for Saturday, 108 for Sunday, and 103 for Monday. Temperatures at night will be warm as well providing little relief, with some places failing to dip below 75. To me, these seem like good values to make your plans off of. However there is the a fair amount of potential for it to be even hotter. Should things line up perfectly (thermal trough parked in perfect place, offshore/downslope flow, no high clouds or smoke) there is the potential for Portland to exceed 108 and possibly even 110!

“Ok it’s gonna get hot like it usually does in the summer, why should I care?”
While tornadoes, hurricanes, and other violent forms of weather often take the top news headlines, a relatively silent killed lurks under blue skies and sunshine. According to the CDC over 650 people each year die from exposure to extreme heat and the medical complications that come with it.

Know the signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke. It could save a live
Click to enlarge

Here in the PNW, many are not blessed with air conditioning. This weekend will be brutal to outright dangerous for those without it. Even potentially deadly to our more vulnerable populations. On top of that, this event is happening right before the 4th of July holiday, with dry conditions persisting throughout the week leading up to it. This is setting the stage for downright scary fire conditions. There is also some concern regarding lightning in the coming week in our higher terrain. Bottom line is that this heatwave can be deadly in itself, and will likely lead to prime conditions for fires.

Some recommendations:

  • Check on friends, neighbors, family, especially those who don’t have AC and/or are particularly vulnerable to excessive heat
  • Do not leave pets, children, or really anything you really care about in your car. Temperatures inside can reach deadly levels within minutes in this kind of heat.
  • Avoid staying outside for long periods of time. If you have to, bring a lot of water and use shade frequently. Wear loose fitting lightly colored clothes.
  • Stay hydrated, drink lots of water and not too many sugary, caffeinated, and/or alcoholic beverages.
  • Even if you have AC, have a backup plan in case of power outages.
  • Know the signs of heat stroke and heat exhaustion. It can save someone's life. See www.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat for more information.
  • Reconsider stocking up on fireworks for 4th of July. I personally don’t think it’s worth the fire risk, even in the city. The fire danger could get to the point where counties ban them due to the risk of fire.
  • If you live in a fire zone, have a plan if a fire breaks out near by.
  • Be kind to each other. Heat like this is stressful and a lot of people will be struggling to get some sleep during this period.

Stay safe and stay smart my friends!

How should Gresham spend $5.4M Metro parks funds?

How should Gresham spend $5.4M Metro parks funds? Survey ends April 26, 2021. Info here! Click to enlarge.
PMG PHOTO: TERESA CARSON - Barbara Kinzie Christman is one of the residents who objects to the Headwaters project in Southwest Gresham. The 30-home development would require removal of 250 mature fir trees, which abutt a undeveloped park and two wetland areas.

Source: Gresham Outlook, April 8 2021
By Teresa Carson

Survey asks folks to rate 10 possible projects, buying Headwaters site is one option

The city of Gresham launched a survey on how to use its Metro parks funds, and depending on public input, could purchase the controversial proposed Headwaters housing development site for park land.

The survey opened Monday, April 5, and asks people's opinions on how to use the $5.4 million that Gresham is getting from the 2019 Metro Parks and Nature bond measure.

There are 10 proposed parks projects totaling $13 million. That's more than twice the funds available from the Metro bond. The survey asks folks to pick the three projects they see as most important.

"The mayor and City Council want to provide an opportunity for public input and want to hear how residents would like to see the city spend our "local share" of this money," said Elizabeth Coffey, Gresham's director of communications. The Headwaters property is included as one of 10 potential projects that could be purchased with these funds," "There are lots of competing needs for this $5.4 million, which is why it is critical that residents tune in and let us know what their priorities are," she added.

The $5.4 million can be used for parks or natural resources projects that boost access to nature, water quality, habitat and protect against climate change. The money cannot be spent on playgrounds, sports fields, recreation programs, pools or fountains.

City Council will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, May 4, to review the results of the public outreach and vote on disposition of the Metro funds, including potential purchase of the Headwaters property.

The proposed Headwaters development has stirred controversy in Gresham and beyond.

Development of the 7.82 acre tract would cut down a dense stand of more than 250 mature fir trees adjacent to a protected wetland area and park. The city approved the project and no appeal was filed.

Formerly owned by the late Helen Shaull, the wedge-shaped property is at 3535 W. Powell Blvd. It is about half-mile east of the Highland Fair shopping center.

The forested site is next to Fairview Creek headwaters, the undeveloped Southwest Community Park and near the Grant Butte Wetlands owned by the city of Gresham. The southwest portion of the site is a Habitat Conservation Area.

A project at Fujitsu Ponds is one of the 10 proposed uses for the $5.4 million in Metro bond funds. The city of Gresham has opened a survey for residents to rank the 10 projects in importance. Info here!
COURTESY PHOTO: CITY OF GRESHAM - A project at Fujitsu Ponds is one of the 10 proposed uses for the $5.4 million in Metro bond funds. The city of Gresham has opened a survey for residents to rank the 10 projects in importance.

"The Shaull property would be a purchase, while all the other projects are for properties that the city already owns. If the Shaull property is not purchased by the city, it will be forever lost. The other parks projects may get money in the future," said Janet Unruh, who does not want to see the Headwaters development proceed.

In addition to the proposed Headwaters purchase, the other nine projects included in the survey are:

• Columbia View Park, 1000 N.E. 169th Ave. The city's $850,000 proposal calls for a nature play area, making trails accessible, a Columbia Gorge viewpoint and other improvements.

• Southeast Neighborhood Park, 3003 S.E. Barnes Road. Trails, picnic facilities, signs and a nature play area would be added to this 6.5 acre undeveloped park at a cost of $600,000.

• Jenne Butte Neighborhood Park, 2358 S.W. Border Way, would get a wetland viewpoint, trails, picnic facilities and more, for $1.2 million.

• East Gresham Neighborhood Park, 237 S.E. Williams Road, would get improvements such as signage, trails, picnic facilities and a nature play area at a cost of $650,000.

• Southeast Community Park, 5600 S.E. Salquist Road, would see soft and paved trails, picnic facilities, a restroom, nature play area, off-leash dog area, and more, at a price of $2 million.

• Southwest Community Park, 3333 West Powell Blvd., would get improvements that could include picnic areas, wetland viewing, trails community gardens, a restroom and more, at a cost of $2.25 million.

• Hogan Butte Nature Education Center, would purchase the undeveloped forest land north of Hogan Butte Nature Park, 757 S.E. Gabbert Road. A home on the property would become the accessible Nature Education Center to engage students in a native plant nursery and other operations. This would cost $700,000.

• Fujitsu Ponds, off Glisan Street near Salish ponds, would get improvements worth $1.75 million. The upgrades would eliminate warm water from going into these ponds, benefiting wildlife and reducing flooding risk. A public natural are would be created.

• Forest health recovery. The proposal is to spend $1 million on forest restoration and safety efforts all over Gresham.

SGS Development LLC, headquartered in Bend, bought the Shaull property for around $1 million and plans to develop the lots and sell the property to a builder to construct the 30 homes.

Chet Antonsen, of SGS Development, said Metro and Gresham had first right of refusal on the property and declined to buy it.

Another of the 10 proposals would spend $2 million on upgrades at Southeast Community Park, a 6. 5 acre undeveloped site on Southeast Barnes Road. Click to enlarge.
COURTESY PHOTO: CITY OF GRESHAM - Another of the 10 proposals would spend $2 million on upgrades at Southeast Community Park, a 6. 5 acre undeveloped site on Southeast Barnes Road.

SGS is asking $2.5 million for the acreage now. The city would spend about $500,000 for improvements for a total cost of $3 million.

The proposed development unleashed a torrent of public comment and controversy. The city received many comments, all opposed to the Headwaters development, from local residents to the The Audubon Society of Portland.

John Bildsoe, vice president of the Coalition of Gresham Neighborhoods, wrote that arrowheads and other artifacts from Indigenous people have been found on the site.

After similar community pushback in 2014, SGS sold the Gantenbein Farm property at 2826 N.W. Division St. it planned to develop, to Metro, Gresham and the East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District (EMSWCD). That property is now the part of the Grant Butte Wetlands.

Take the survey
Share your thoughts on how the city could use its portion of Metro parks funds by taking a survey at: GreshamOregon.gov/Parks-Planning

For more information email: ParkOptions@GreshamOregon.gov or leave a voicemail: 503-618-2145. Instructions will be in English and Spanish.

Paper surveys will be available upon request.

The survey is due by Monday, April 26.

Survey responses are limited to one per person. Duplicate submittals will be removed.


This story first appeared in The Outlook. Support community newspapers. Subscribe at http://savinglocalnews.com

Gresham forms parks advisory committee

Gresham
Gresham Mayor Travis Stovall

City hopes team can change decade of funding frustration, improve parks & recreation

Source: Gresham Outlook, March 19 2021
By Christopher Keizur

A decade ago, Travis Stovall joined a task force dedicated to seeking solutions for Gresham's parks funding woes.

The Green Ribbon Task Force was created in 2010 to address the need for sustainable parks funding within the city. After investigating various funding methods, the task force put forward its suggestion — a parks district in East Multnomah County.

The idea represented an exciting way to bolster parks and recreation that had been withering for years. The task force wanted the city to implement a $0.25 property tax levy to generate roughly $2.1 million a year. They spoke of Gresham partnering with Fairview, Wood Village and Troutdale, which would have resulted in an annual payment of $31 to $53 for the average home in East Multnomah County.

But that idea was never put before voters as a ballot measure to save parks, with city officials citing a lack of support from the public. Thus, the city effectively ignored the work done by the Green Ribbon Task Force.

"I was disappointed they didn't move forward with the ideas," said Stovall, who has since been elected as mayor of Gresham. "At this point, we need multiple opportunities for council to work with and think of initiatives that would lead to (parks) ballot measures."

Now 10 years later, Gresham is convening another green team to investigate potential solutions to stop the continued hemorrhaging of parks and recreation.

During a Tuesday morning, March 16, meeting, Gresham City Council helped plan the Parks Community Advisory Group. The team would have up to 30 members, with a broad representation of the community and members who live or work in Gresham. The city wants to have 30% of participants be Black, Indigenous or people of color.

The Parks Community Advisory Group would create a vision and options for the future of Gresham parks and recreation — including two or three funding options and mechanisms to support them in an effort to avoid the failure the last time this was attempted.

"We really want to make sure council's expectations are clear to this group to avoid any frustrations," said Steve Fancher, director of environmental services and city operations.

The city hopes to find participants for the Parks Community Advisory Group in the coming weeks, and will be recruiting from local organizations and communitites.


This story first appeared in The Outlook. Support community newspapers. Subscribe at http://savinglocalnews.com

Youth gardeners cultivate Gresham park

Nonprofit Play Grow Learn celebrates youth-oriented efforts at Nadaka Nature Park. Info here!
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - Gresham Mayor Travis Stovall celebrated the youths maintaining Nadaka Nature Park during a visit Thursday morning, March 11.

Source: Gresham Outlook, March 16 2021
By Christopher Keizur

Nonprofit Play Grow Learn celebrates youth-oriented efforts at Nadaka Nature Park

When the winter ice storm hit East Multnomah County earlier this year, it wreaked havoc on a popular Rockwood greenspace.

Nadaka Nature Park had been buffeted by rain, sleet, snow and high-winds. Branches fell across the 10-acre property, young trees had been uprooted, pathways destroyed, and the community garden was a mess.

But for the youths who have been working at Nadaka for the past year, the damage was not daunting. Instead they rolled up their sleeves, grabbed their shovels, and got to work.

"This park is beautiful," said 19-year-old Rico Garland. "We all care about it and helping our community."

Twice a week, 20 youths have been working at Nadaka Nature Park, 17615 N.E. Glisan St., through the nonprofit Play Grow Learn. They plant, weed, and clean the park to ensure it remains a safe and fun place for local families to visit.

The Play Grow Learn youths, ages 15-24, all receive a stipend for their work, and are helping fill the gaps in Gresham when it comes to funding and maintaining parks. For those kids, Play Grow Learn led to the first time they had ever visited Nadaka, despite it being in their community.

"They want to work and take ownership of the park," said Germaine Flentroy, program coordinator with Play Grow Learn. "All it takes is one opportunity."

Now, if not for the youths, the state of Nadaka would be in a much more dire place.

"I'm so grateful (they) are helping maintain this park, because the city isn't able to," said Lee Dayfield, the creative force behind Nadaka.

The youths led Gresham leaders on a tour of everything they have accomplished at Nadaka in the past year. Click to enlarge.
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - The youths led Gresham leaders on a tour of everything they have accomplished at Nadaka in the past year.

On Thursday, March 11, those kids were able to showcase their hard work to Gresham Mayor Travis Stovall, who visited Nadaka to learn more about Play Grow Learn's efforts.

The mayor walked along a newly constructed path through the wooded area, toured the gardens where community members are learning to grow their own healthy produce, and admired the dozens of trees that have been planted. He even got a lesson on how to propagate new plants from cuttings.

"What Play Grow Learn is accomplishing here is incredibly important and impressive," Stovall said. "The best part was listening to their passion about planting trees."

The tour was also a chance for the youths to connect with the new leader of their city. Many were excited to meet "someone famous," and used the opportunity to speak with Stovall about what their communities need.

And of course, they were proud to show Stovall all that has been accomplished at Nadaka.

"Do you see that — we planted those trees," Garland said.

Fund-amental problem

For many years it has been the same song, different tune in Gresham — the city does not have the funding to support parks.

The problems began two decades ago with a pair of ballot measures passed in Gresham that hamstrung the city's ability to fund greenspaces.

Mayor Travis Stovall spoke about the need to find funding mechanisms for Greshams parks. Click to enlarge.
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - Mayor Travis Stovall spoke about the need to find funding mechanisms for Greshams parks.

The votes set a permanent property tax that was the second lowest in the state.

In 1990, Gresham's property taxes paid for 100% of police and fire services. Now, those taxes are only able to foot 40% of those expenses. And the lion's share goes to public safety, leaving parks to wither.

"It's about funding mechanisms to get our parks to a new level," Stovall said.

One solution would be to form a parks district, which the city is investigating with a feasibility study. The district would have the power to construct, reconstruct, alter, enlarge, operate and maintain lakes, parks, recreation grounds and buildings; acquire necessary lands; and to call necessary elections after being formed.

But it is difficult to implement, and necessitates city leadership lessening control over greenspaces and a successful public vote. Other solutions include a new parks utility fee; increasing the existing Police-Fire-Parks fee; or vying for an Operations Levy/Bond Measure, which would collect from property taxes.

A group within the community, including Dayfield and other leaders at Nadaka, have also requested participatory budgeting when it comes to parks, which allows for community input in how to spend funds.

"Years ago the city had to cut parks and recreation programs, which was really hard on the community," said Keri Handaly, who works with the Nadaka kids through Gresham's water resources division. "Programs like Play Grow Learn help bring back those needed services."

While there are no easy answers, the work being done by youths at Nadaka highlight a potential future for the city's parks.

"We are doing the stuff that otherwise isn't going to get done, and showing the city what can be accomplished with a shoestring budget," said Anthony Bradley, executive director of Play Grow Learn.

Seeking support

Play Grow Learn youths are filling in the gaps at Nadaka Nature Park. Click to enlarge.
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - Play Grow Learn youths are filling in the gaps at Nadaka Nature Park.

Play Grow Learn is thriving at Nadaka thanks to a coalition of partners all coming together.

Friends of Nadaka lends guidance and has continued its ambassador program.

Vanessa Chambers and Rhonda Combs continuing oversight at the park, tidying the playground and ensuring the space remains safe and welcome to the many families who visit.

City staff and Friends of Trees visit to provide expertise; Adam Kohl and Outgrowing Hunger operate the community garden and assist in securing grants; East Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District provides funding; and Metro Regional Government and East County Rising both have backed the nonprofit organization.

The latest partnership is with PGE Project Zero, which will send two interns this summer to help Play Grow Learn at Nadaka.

"The program connects young folks with meaningful employment," Taaj Armstrong, cohort dean for Project Zero's green jobs internship program. "We are so excited to partner with Play Grow Learn."

But everything Play Grow Learn is accomplishing remains on unstable ground.

"This all could be gone tomorrow," Flentroy said. "We are surviving on short-term grants and solutions."

Play Grow Learn requires more support to keep going, and they hope the visit from Mayor Stovall might signal future backing from the city of Gresham. The nonprofit organization needs more stable funding and in-kind support to continue teaching youths skills and keeping them out of dangerous situations.

"I believe the support is out there," Bradley said.

If they can secure it, Play Grow Learn has a bright vision for Gresham. They want similar programs in every East Multnomah County park, with teams of teens caring for greenspaces, learning valuable skills, and finding future employment opportunities.

"We all have to do our part to represent and teach kids of color," Flentroy said.

Support Play Grow Learn
To volunteer or provide donations to Play Grow Learn to back its efforts to teach youths valuable skills, email Anthony Bradley anthonybradleypgl@gmail.com or Germaine Flentroy gflentroypgl@gmail.com.


This story first appeared in The Outlook. Support community newspapers. Subscribe at http://savinglocalnews.com

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Spring 2021 Newsletter here!

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Spring 2021 Newsletter here! Wilkes East Neighborhood, Gresham Oregon USA. Diversity, Harmony, Community- Together 'WE' can make a difference.

2021 Spring Newsletter

"Diversity, Harmony, Community -
Together 'WE' can make a difference!”


alt=Read it now!

Spring 2021 Newsletter

Inside This Issue:

  • Downtown Rockwood Arrives
  • Albertina Kerr Housing Update
  • Wilkes East Land-Use Update
  • Reporting Livability Issues
  • Hazardous Spills, Who To Call
  • Neighborhood Tree Outreach

Download your copy here. (includes active web links)

Newsletters are a regular publication of the Wilkes East Neighborhood Association. They are hand-delivered to over 1,500 residences and businesses in our area 3 times per year, timed to correspond with our regular meetings.

View archive   |   Policy & Ad Rates

Got a story or tip to share?
Wilkes East residents are encouraged to submit articles and tips for the newsletter. Articles should be limited to 300-500 words and may be subject to editing Include a related photo. Send by email to chair@wilkeseastna.org, or by postal mail to: 17104 NE Oregon St • Portland OR 97230.

Volunteers Needed
Newsletters are hand-delivered to Wilkes East residents and businesses by neighborhood volunteers. There are always routes that need delivery people. Routes are small and many. We can always use your help.
To volunteer contact chair@wilkeseastna.org.

'Green Gresham, Healthy Gresham' Grant Project Adding Street Trees to West Gresham Neighborhoods

'Green Gresham, Healthy Gresham' Grant Project Adding Street Trees to West Gresham Neighborhoods. Planting from Dec 2020 to end of February 2021. Details here!

'Green Gresham, Healthy Gresham' Grant Project

The City of Gresham is partnering with Multnomah County Office of Sustainability and Friends of Trees on a grant from East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District (EMSWCD) to get trees surveyed, maintained and planted in the Rockwood, Wilkes East and North Gresham Neighborhoods. From mid- December 2020 to end of February 2021, you may notice a small
crew of three to four members wearing bright fluorescent safety vests, known as the Gresham Tree Team. The 2020 Gresham Tree Team is a group of County staff and interns making the following improvements to your neighborhood:

  • Tree planting activities such as digging holes, planting trees, and moving mulch;
  • Tree surveying and measuring in the public right of way to gather data on the tree type, size, and health; and
  • Tree maintenance in the public right of way along arterial and neighborhood streets.

Gresham Tree Team
From 2018 – 2020 this team has:

  • Inventoried 1300 trees
  • Planted over 300 street and yard trees
  • Recruited 80 homeowners to plant yard trees

This EMSWCD Green Gresham, Healthy Gresham grant project will improve your neighborhood with information on where to plant more trees along with newly planted trees that will help:

  • Cool the urban environment during our hot summers
  • Provide windbreaks and help conserve energy during our cold winters
  • Improve the walking environment and air quality along busy West Gresham streets
  • Reduce water pollution flowing into local streams and waterways

Work will be performed Tuesday through Saturday (9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.)

More Info
If you have any questions or would like to learn more, please contact Tina.Osterink@GreshamOregon.gov or call directly at 503.618-2392.

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Fall 2020 Newsletter here!

Download the Wilkes East Neighborhood Fall 2020 Newsletter here! Wilkes East Neighborhood, Gresham Oregon USA. Diversity, Harmony, Community- Together 'WE' can make a difference.

2020 Fall Newsletter

"Diversity, Harmony, Community -
Together 'WE' can make a difference!”


alt=
Read it now!

Fall 2020 Newsletter

Inside This Issue:

  • Virtual School Challenges
  • WENA Board Elections Nov 9th
  • Wilkes East Land-Use Update
  • Holiday Gatherings & Covid-19
  • Online Scammers; Elder Fraud
  • Tips to Prepare For Winter

Download your copy here. (includes active web links)

Newsletters are a regular publication of the Wilkes East Neighborhood Association. They are hand-delivered to over 1,500 residences and businesses in our area 3 times per year, timed to correspond with our regular meetings.

View archive   |   Policy & Ad Rates

Got a story or tip to share?
Wilkes East residents are encouraged to submit articles and tips for the newsletter. Articles should be limited to 300-500 words and may be subject to editing Include a related photo. Send by email to chair@wilkeseastna.org, or by postal mail to: 17104 NE Oregon St • Portland OR 97230.

Volunteers Needed
Newsletters are hand-delivered to Wilkes East residents and businesses by neighborhood volunteers. There are always routes that need delivery people. Routes are small and many. We can always use your help.
To volunteer contact chair@wilkeseastna.org.

Measure 26-218 is bad for Gresham neighborhoods

Measure 26-218 is bad for Gresham neighborhoods. Info here!

Metro's proposed Clackamas to Columbia River connector will impact school zones and pedestrian traffic on Northeast 181st Avenue

By Mike Elston, President
North Gresham Neighborhood Association

As President of the North Gresham Neighborhood Association, I'm informed about development plans that impact our neighborhood. Recently I became aware of a Metro proposal that'll increase traffic from Clackamas to the Columbia River ("C2C"), largely by routing it down Northeast 181st /182nd. Although the scheme has apparently been in development for years, Metro and the city of Gresham are only now involving North Gresham citizens — at a point where it's nearly a done-deal.

We have a number of concerns about C2C we feel aren't being heard by Metro. We strongly believe this will have the effect of transforming 181st /182nd into another 82nd Avenue. It will certainly increase traffic, which is already a nightmare during rush hour. That, in turn, will negatively impact the three schools along its proposed route as well as pedestrian access to the MAX and to our area's one grocery store.

We're at a loss to understand how this benefits North Gresham (and maybe that's why we weren't informed about the plan until it was too late to have much impact). Metro claims it'll provide jobs, but they're temporary employment during construction and not permanent.

In our view, this only benefits the higher-income residents of Happy Valley at the expense of Gresham's north-end, lower-income neighborhoods.

Funding for the C2C would be provided by the passage of Metro bond measure M 26-218 in November, and our only chance to delay C2C and permit more time for citizen feedback is for the measure to fail.

We therefore, ask for your help. Join us in voting NO on Measure 26-218, November 3, 2020.

Learn More
Link to the September 10, 2020 “Open house” recorded meeting via Zoom:
https://openhouse.jla.us.com/files/clackamasconnections/gmt20200911-010420-c2c-listen-1920x1080.mp4?166f9c500f
Presentation of slides:
https://openhouse.jla.us.com/files/clackamasconnections/c2c-planpresentation-final.pdf?20acff122f
It would appear some initial road construction has already started in Clackamas County (172nd/190th connection), as well as nearby at NE 181st and Glisan (Tree removal and road widening).

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