Volunteer

Become a Neighborhood Wildlife Watcher, Volunteer training: Oct 16, 2010 10AM

10/16/2010 - 10:00am
Etc/GMT-8
Become a Neighborhood Wildlife Watcher, Volunteer training: Oct 16 & 21, 2010. Info here!

Listen to songbirds,
Enjoy the great outdoors

Learn surveying & monitoring techniques, Meet your non-human neighbors

When: Saturday Oct 16, 2010 10AM-12PM
Where: Gresham City Hall
1333 NW Eastman Pkwy
Gresham, OR
Get Map!

RSVP: Laura.Guderyahn@GreshamOregon.gov or phone 503-618-2246 to reserve your spot today!

Neighborhood Wildlife Watchers October Training

We’re looking for Neighborhood Wildlife Watchers to monitor habitat structures in your neighborhood or around the community. Volunteers may find flying squirrels, wood ducks, songbirds, swallows, and bats. Opportunities exist for individuals and groups of all ages and skill levels.

Two October trainings with City staff will teach monitoring techniques and match volunteers with sites convenient for you:

  • Saturday, Octover 16 10AM-12PM
  • Thursday, October 21 6PM-8PM

Neighborhood Wildlife Watchers brochure

Become a Neighborhood Wildlife Watcher, Volunteer training: Oct 21, 2010 6PM

10/21/2010 - 6:00pm
10/21/2010 - 8:00pm
Etc/GMT-8
Become a Neighborhood Wildlife Watcher, Volunteer training: Oct 16 & 21, 2010. Info here!

Listen to songbirds,
Enjoy the great outdoors

Learn surveying & monitoring techniques, Meet your non-human neighbors

When: Thursday Oct 21, 2010 6PM-8PM
Where: Gresham City Hall
1333 NW Eastman Pkwy
Gresham, OR
Get Map!

RSVP: Laura.Guderyahn@GreshamOregon.gov or phone 503-618-2246 to reserve your spot today!

Neighborhood Wildlife Watchers October Training

We’re looking for Neighborhood Wildlife Watchers to monitor habitat structures in your neighborhood or around the community. Volunteers may find flying squirrels, wood ducks, songbirds, swallows, and bats. Opportunities exist for individuals and groups of all ages and skill levels.

Two October trainings with City staff will teach monitoring techniques and match volunteers with sites convenient for you:

  • Saturday, Octover 16 10AM-12PM
  • Thursday, October 21 6PM-8PM

Neighborhood Wildlife Watchers brochure

Wilkes East Neighborhood, Newsletter Archive

Newsletter Archive | Wilkes East Neighborhood, Gresham Oregon USA. Diversity, Harmony, Community - Together 'WE' can make a difference! Click here!

Newsletter Archive

"Diversity, Harmony, Community -
Together 'WE' can make a difference!”


alt=
Read it now!

Summer 2021 Newsletter

Inside This Issue:

  • Trackers, Never Lose Stuff Again
  • New Special Needs Adult Program
  • Wilkes East Land-Use Update
  • Saving 267 Trees; Shaull Woods
  • Meet City Councilor Dina DiNucci

A publication of:

Wilkes East Neighborhood Association
Gresham OR USA

View archive   |   Policy & Ad Rates

Newsletters are a regular publication of the Wilkes East Neighborhood Association. They are hand-delivered to over 1,500 residences and businesses in our area 3 times per year, timed to correspond with our general meetings.

Got a story or tip to share?
Wilkes East residents are encouraged to submit articles and tips for the newsletter. Articles should be limited to 300 words and may be subject to editing. Send by email to chair@wilkeseastna.org, or by postal mail to: 17104 NE Oregon St • Portland OR 97230. Deadline for submission is three weeks prior to publication.

Volunteers Needed
Newsletters are hand-delivered to Wilkes East residents and businesses by neighborhood volunteers. There are usually routes that need delivery people. Routes are small and many. We can always use your help.
To volunteer contact chair@wilkeseastna.org.

Volunteer Opportunity at Nadaka Nature Park: Sep 28 - Nov 5, 2021

Volunteer Opportunity at Nadaka Nature Park: Sep 28 - Nov 5, 2021. etired, have a flexible schedule, want some exercise, need school credits? The City of Gresham is requesting volunteer. Info here!

Retired, have a flexible schedule, want some exercise, need school credits? The City of Gresham is requesting volunteer support to help manage trails and plant species in the forest at Nadaka Nature Park, 17550 NE Pacific St.

Work will be led by PGE interns and will include digging, pulling and pruning. Work will require use of shovels, loppers and wheelbarrows. Equipment and work gloves will be provided, we suggest you bring your own water bottle. Bring sturdy work shoes and clothing you’re comfortable working in, as we approach fall weather please ensure to come dressed for the weather.

Covid-19 protocols: Everyone must be wearing a mask at all times, unless more than 6ft away from others. Hand sanitizer will be provided. Volunteers will be required to complete an application and sign a waiver.

Volunteer schedule: Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 1:00pm-5:30pm, Thursdays and Fridays 10:00am-2:30pm

More Info?
Please email keri.handaly@GreshamOregon.gov to inquire/rsvp.

Youth gardeners cultivate Gresham park

Nonprofit Play Grow Learn celebrates youth-oriented efforts at Nadaka Nature Park. Info here!
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - Gresham Mayor Travis Stovall celebrated the youths maintaining Nadaka Nature Park during a visit Thursday morning, March 11.

Source: Gresham Outlook, March 16 2021
By Christopher Keizur

Nonprofit Play Grow Learn celebrates youth-oriented efforts at Nadaka Nature Park

When the winter ice storm hit East Multnomah County earlier this year, it wreaked havoc on a popular Rockwood greenspace.

Nadaka Nature Park had been buffeted by rain, sleet, snow and high-winds. Branches fell across the 10-acre property, young trees had been uprooted, pathways destroyed, and the community garden was a mess.

But for the youths who have been working at Nadaka for the past year, the damage was not daunting. Instead they rolled up their sleeves, grabbed their shovels, and got to work.

"This park is beautiful," said 19-year-old Rico Garland. "We all care about it and helping our community."

Twice a week, 20 youths have been working at Nadaka Nature Park, 17615 N.E. Glisan St., through the nonprofit Play Grow Learn. They plant, weed, and clean the park to ensure it remains a safe and fun place for local families to visit.

The Play Grow Learn youths, ages 15-24, all receive a stipend for their work, and are helping fill the gaps in Gresham when it comes to funding and maintaining parks. For those kids, Play Grow Learn led to the first time they had ever visited Nadaka, despite it being in their community.

"They want to work and take ownership of the park," said Germaine Flentroy, program coordinator with Play Grow Learn. "All it takes is one opportunity."

Now, if not for the youths, the state of Nadaka would be in a much more dire place.

"I'm so grateful (they) are helping maintain this park, because the city isn't able to," said Lee Dayfield, the creative force behind Nadaka.

The youths led Gresham leaders on a tour of everything they have accomplished at Nadaka in the past year. Click to enlarge.
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - The youths led Gresham leaders on a tour of everything they have accomplished at Nadaka in the past year.

On Thursday, March 11, those kids were able to showcase their hard work to Gresham Mayor Travis Stovall, who visited Nadaka to learn more about Play Grow Learn's efforts.

The mayor walked along a newly constructed path through the wooded area, toured the gardens where community members are learning to grow their own healthy produce, and admired the dozens of trees that have been planted. He even got a lesson on how to propagate new plants from cuttings.

"What Play Grow Learn is accomplishing here is incredibly important and impressive," Stovall said. "The best part was listening to their passion about planting trees."

The tour was also a chance for the youths to connect with the new leader of their city. Many were excited to meet "someone famous," and used the opportunity to speak with Stovall about what their communities need.

And of course, they were proud to show Stovall all that has been accomplished at Nadaka.

"Do you see that — we planted those trees," Garland said.

Fund-amental problem

For many years it has been the same song, different tune in Gresham — the city does not have the funding to support parks.

The problems began two decades ago with a pair of ballot measures passed in Gresham that hamstrung the city's ability to fund greenspaces.

Mayor Travis Stovall spoke about the need to find funding mechanisms for Greshams parks. Click to enlarge.
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - Mayor Travis Stovall spoke about the need to find funding mechanisms for Greshams parks.

The votes set a permanent property tax that was the second lowest in the state.

In 1990, Gresham's property taxes paid for 100% of police and fire services. Now, those taxes are only able to foot 40% of those expenses. And the lion's share goes to public safety, leaving parks to wither.

"It's about funding mechanisms to get our parks to a new level," Stovall said.

One solution would be to form a parks district, which the city is investigating with a feasibility study. The district would have the power to construct, reconstruct, alter, enlarge, operate and maintain lakes, parks, recreation grounds and buildings; acquire necessary lands; and to call necessary elections after being formed.

But it is difficult to implement, and necessitates city leadership lessening control over greenspaces and a successful public vote. Other solutions include a new parks utility fee; increasing the existing Police-Fire-Parks fee; or vying for an Operations Levy/Bond Measure, which would collect from property taxes.

A group within the community, including Dayfield and other leaders at Nadaka, have also requested participatory budgeting when it comes to parks, which allows for community input in how to spend funds.

"Years ago the city had to cut parks and recreation programs, which was really hard on the community," said Keri Handaly, who works with the Nadaka kids through Gresham's water resources division. "Programs like Play Grow Learn help bring back those needed services."

While there are no easy answers, the work being done by youths at Nadaka highlight a potential future for the city's parks.

"We are doing the stuff that otherwise isn't going to get done, and showing the city what can be accomplished with a shoestring budget," said Anthony Bradley, executive director of Play Grow Learn.

Seeking support

Play Grow Learn youths are filling in the gaps at Nadaka Nature Park. Click to enlarge.
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - Play Grow Learn youths are filling in the gaps at Nadaka Nature Park.

Play Grow Learn is thriving at Nadaka thanks to a coalition of partners all coming together.

Friends of Nadaka lends guidance and has continued its ambassador program.

Vanessa Chambers and Rhonda Combs continuing oversight at the park, tidying the playground and ensuring the space remains safe and welcome to the many families who visit.

City staff and Friends of Trees visit to provide expertise; Adam Kohl and Outgrowing Hunger operate the community garden and assist in securing grants; East Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District provides funding; and Metro Regional Government and East County Rising both have backed the nonprofit organization.

The latest partnership is with PGE Project Zero, which will send two interns this summer to help Play Grow Learn at Nadaka.

"The program connects young folks with meaningful employment," Taaj Armstrong, cohort dean for Project Zero's green jobs internship program. "We are so excited to partner with Play Grow Learn."

But everything Play Grow Learn is accomplishing remains on unstable ground.

"This all could be gone tomorrow," Flentroy said. "We are surviving on short-term grants and solutions."

Play Grow Learn requires more support to keep going, and they hope the visit from Mayor Stovall might signal future backing from the city of Gresham. The nonprofit organization needs more stable funding and in-kind support to continue teaching youths skills and keeping them out of dangerous situations.

"I believe the support is out there," Bradley said.

If they can secure it, Play Grow Learn has a bright vision for Gresham. They want similar programs in every East Multnomah County park, with teams of teens caring for greenspaces, learning valuable skills, and finding future employment opportunities.

"We all have to do our part to represent and teach kids of color," Flentroy said.

Support Play Grow Learn
To volunteer or provide donations to Play Grow Learn to back its efforts to teach youths valuable skills, email Anthony Bradley anthonybradleypgl@gmail.com or Germaine Flentroy gflentroypgl@gmail.com.


This story first appeared in The Outlook. Support community newspapers. Subscribe at http://savinglocalnews.com

City of Gresham Bird Survey Training: Thu, Jan 07, 2021 via Zoom

01/07/2021 - 10:00am
01/07/2021 - 10:59am
Etc/GMT-8
City of Gresham Bird Survey Training: Thu, Jan 07, 2021 via Zoom. 2PM-3:30PM & 6PM-7:30PM. Seeking Volunteers. Info here!

Seeking Volunteers

When: Thu, Jan 07, 2021 via Zoom
Time: 2:00PM-3:30PM & 6:00PM-7:30PM
Where: Via Zoom

Gresham residents may participate in our COVID-safe bird survey this winter to help the City collect information about local bird populations and habitat needs. The City is offering free online training to all interested volunteers. Experience is not required, and training is open to all ages. Families are encouraged to join in.

The bird survey training will include:

  • How to identify birds.
  • How to use a bird survey application that will allow you to upload your findings to an international bird database.

A smartphone or computer is required. All other materials will be provided.

Two trainings are available via Zoom:

  • Thursday Jan. 7, from 2:00 to 3:30 pm
  • Thursday Jan. 7, from 6:00 to 7:30 pm

RSVP to receive the training invitation.

For more information, contact Marissa.Eckman@GreshamOregon.gov

Learn more about the City's bird surveys.

Cultivating solutions for Gresham's parks

Youth volunteers tend Nadaka Nature Park as city parks funding woes take root

Cultivating solutions for Gresham's parks. Youth volunteers tend Nadaka Nature Park as city parks funding woes take root. Info here!
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - Germaine Flentroy Jr. lugs a bucket of water across Nadaka Nature Park while helping maintain the greenspace.

Source: Gresham Outlook, Jun 22, 2020
By Christopher Keizur

A group of youth made a troubling discovery one afternoon while volunteering at Nadaka Nature Park.

Vandals had ripped out a young tree planted to provide shade in the Nadaka meadow for a popular bench among those seeking a quiet way to spend the afternoon. The tree, which had been planted earlier this spring, had been carelessly tossed to the side.

So the youth got to work. They re-dug a hole and got the tree back upright. Then they lugged water across the park to give the tree the best chance for survival. The work in Nadaka is just one way youth counselors with nonprofit Play Grow Learn are giving back to their community.

"I'm so grateful you all are helping maintain this park, because the city isn't able to," said Lee Dayfield, the creative force behind Nadaka.

Their support comes at a crucial time for one of the most unique parks in Gresham. Funding officially dried up at Nadaka, 17615 N.E. Glisan St., on June 1 — marking a major shift in what was once touted as the model for future parks in the city.

What made it special was the ongoing bevy of activities happening within the space.

There were cleanups, partnerships with schools, bird walks and workshops on native plants and pollinators. Nadaka hosted an annual free community festival that celebrated Rockwood's diversity, and employed a group of "Park Ambassadors," who served as the face of Nadaka — educating visitors and ensuring the park stayed safe and clean.

Cultivating solutions for Gresham's parks. Youth volunteers tend Nadaka Nature Park as city parks funding woes take root. Info here!

PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - Nick Johnson, 20, lives only a few blocks away from Nadaka Nature Park.

All of it was made possible by chasing grants.

"We knew raising funds this way was not sustainable," Dayfield said. "We hoped the city of Gresham would fill in the gaps, but that didn't happen."

City staff, who are overstretched among the 56 parks with more than 300 acres of space, can only mow the grass and empty the trash cans at Nadaka. Funding is also a major issue in Gresham, leading many voices to call for innovative new ways to raise money for parks.

A new coalition has been meeting virtually and is outlining a formal plan. So far, more than a dozen organizations have joined, including Play Grow Learn. It's a diverse mix of people that are all united in seeking a better way to reinvest in the parks system.

Several short and long-term funding ideas have been earmarked, though nothing is at the stage to make a formal pitch to the city. So in the meantime, it will be groups like the Play Grow Learn youth who do the majority of the work.

"We are doing the stuff that otherwise isn't going to get done," said Anthony Bradley, executive director of Play Grow Learn. "We are showing what can be done at our parks on a small budget."

Problems at Nadaka

Cultivating solutions for Gresham's parks. Youth volunteers tend Nadaka Nature Park as city parks funding woes take root. Info here!
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - Play Grow Learn youth volunteers replant a tree in Nadaka Nature Park that had been ripped out by vandals.

Nineteen-year-old Rico Garland had never been to Nadaka before he found himself removing invasive ivy from the wooded-trail system as part of Play Grow Learn's Days at Nadaka.

But soon the East Portland teen fell in love with the park.

"It's great to help out the community," Garland said. "This place is so beautiful."

Nadaka is a 10-acre property acquired from the Camp Fire Columbia organization in 1995. It was purchased thanks to Gresham voters passing an open-spaces bond measure in 1990.

In spring 2015, Nadaka celebrated an opening to the public, featuring wooden play structures, a community garden, restroom, picnic shelter, walking loop and public art.

"All of this is because of the hard work of community members," Dayfield said. "We all volunteered because we love this place."

Dayfield poured a lot of herself into supporting Nadaka. She spearheaded the charge to transform her dream park into a reality, overcoming red tape and bureaucracy to found Friends of Nadaka to secure grants and other funding.

For many years the Columbia Slough Watershed Council, a Portland-based organization, had supported the Gresham park. But with changes to the board and executive director, the watershed council decided to focus on other projects.

That caused the funding to run out at the beginning of this month, leaving a beautiful green space with nothing to do. There is some hope for the park — nonprofit Outgrowing Hunger has stepped in as the new fiscal agent for Friends of Nadaka, and was able to capture a $25,000 grant from the East Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District. That grant was secured thanks to a funding match from the city.

But still Dayfield, and other members of the parks coalition, are seeking more permanent answers for the entire community.

The problems began two decades ago with a pair of ballot measures passed in Gresham that hamstrung the city's ability to fund parks. The votes set a permanent property tax that was the second lowest in the state.

The fallout was immediate

In 1990, Gresham's property taxes paid for 100% of police and fire services. Now, those taxes are only able to foot 40% of those expenses. As a result the city had to get creative in filling in the gaps. With the priority being safety, police and fire get the lion's share, leaving parks to wither.

Cultivating solutions for Gresham's parks. Youth volunteers tend Nadaka Nature Park as city parks funding woes take root. Info here!
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - Germain Flentroy Jr. and Jim Labbe fill a device with water that will give a replanted tree the best chance at survival.

Ideas have been bandied about by the parks coalition.

One long-term answer would be to look into forming a parks district, which has the power to construct, reconstruct, alter, enlarge, operate and maintain lakes, parks, recreation grounds and buildings; acquire necessary lands; and to call necessary elections after being formed. It isn't easy to implement a parks district, necessitating city leadership lessening its control over greenspaces, a feasibility study and public vote.

Other solutions have been a new parks utility fee; increasing the existing Police-Fire-Parks fee that was enacted in 2012; or vying for an Operations Levy/Bond Measure, that would also collect from property taxes.

Perhaps the most immediate proposal is participatory budgeting, which involves the community in choosing how to spend funds.

The city could start small, setting aside $100,000 in the first year. Different groups would pitch proposals on how to spend that pot, eventually leading to a community vote on what to fund. The city could set up guidelines that would shape what sort of proposals could be considered, but otherwise it places the onus in the hands of the community to grow and develop parks.

If participatory budgeting proved to be successful, it could be expanded.

"We could scale up and better fund all of our parks," said Jim Labbe, a former urban conservationist with the Audubon Society of Portland.

Lending a hand

Cultivating solutions for Gresham's parks. Youth volunteers tend Nadaka Nature Park as city parks funding woes take root. Info here!
PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR - A group of volunteers spent an afternoon replanting a tree that had been ripped out of the ground.

Germaine Flentroy loves to visit Nadaka Nature Park with his youngest children, ages 4, 6 and 9.

They fondly refer to it as "the water park" because one of their favorite activities is playing with a water spigot by the climbing structure. When the weather is nice the Flentroys will enjoy a picnic in the grass, scratching that camping itch put on hold due to restrictions from the COVID-19 pandemic.

So for Flentroy, program coordinator with Play Grow Learn, setting up a program to maintain the greenspace was a no-brainer.

"We want to be involved in our parks beyond having conversations," he said. "We have to do our part to represent and teach kids of color."

Normally this time of the year, the youth involved with Play Grow Learn would be helming camps for homeless and foster children as counselors. With the pandemic, the nonprofit organization based in Rockwood pivoted to food boxes for underserved families and the park cleanups. It is the youth who would have been camp counselors that have dived into their new roles.

Every week, 8-10 volunteers spend a couple of hours weeding, picking up trash, and undoing damage done by vandals. They also water plants in need of attention. The youth are paid by Play Grow Learn for their time in the park, and it is being used as an opportunity to teach them and hopefully foster a love for horticulture.

Eventually, when COVID-19 restrictions loosen, Play Grow Learn will have a field trip day where it brings the younger campers to Nadaka for an afternoon of fun.

And soon another group of teens will begin helping at Nadaka. Rosemary Anderson High School's Summer Works Group will be doing forest restoration at the park.

"These types of programs send a message to the city that people care about our parks," Labbe said.

Until Gresham is able to figure out funding, it will be up to volunteers to continue caring for their parks.

"Nature is for all," Flentroy said. "It's a safe place where you can get healed."

This story first appeared in The Outlook. Support community newspapers. Subscribe at http://savinglocalnews.com

Watershed Wide 2020: Sat, Mar 07, 2020 8:45AM-12PM

03/07/2020 - 8:45am
03/07/2020 - 12:00pm
Etc/GMT-8
Watershed Wide 2020: Sat, Mar 07, 2020 8:45AM-12PM. Grab Your Gloves! Info here!

Grab Your Gloves!

When: Sat, Mar 07, 2020 8:45AM-12PM
Where: Two locations in Gresham
Get Map!

  • Plant, weed and mulch with us
  • Snacks, tools and lunch provided
  • Family-friendly event

Johnson Creek is urban, but it is home to a variety of wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon. We will be working at ten locations along the 26-mile watershed in an effort to revitalize and protect this unique waterway. Find the location nearest you, come out and get your hands dirty, and enjoy a free lunch with us.

Gresham locations

For more information about this event, contact Courtney Beckel at courtney@jcwc.org or 503-652-7477, ext. 101.

Register to volunteer.

City of Gresham Repair Cafe, Mar 2020: Sat, Mar 07, 2020 10AM-12:30PM

03/07/2020 - 10:00am
03/07/2020 - 12:30pm
Etc/GMT-8
City of Gresham Repair Cafe, Mar 2020: Sat, Mar 07, 2020 10AM-12:30PM. Don't Toss It! Let's Fix It! Info here!

Don't Toss It. Let's Fix It!

When: Sat, Mar 07, 2020 10AM-12:30PM
Where: Habitat for Humanity ReStore
610 NE 181 Ave.
Get Map!

Get your broken items fixed by community volunteers for free. The City of Gresham and Coalition of Neighborhood Associations are teaming up to bring people with repair skills together to help neighbors fix their broken items.

Types of household items repaired

  • Broken bicycles, chains and tires
  • Torn clothing, missing buttons and other fabric repairs
  • Broken lamps, clocks, fans and small kitchen appliances
  • Broken laptops, VCRs, DVD or CD players, printers, calculators, Gameboys and remote controls

Please note: Televisions, microwaves, sewing machines and small engines are not repairable at this event.

What to expect

  • Try to bring anything that may be needed to repair your item; Parts, buttons, matching thread, power cords, batteries, connecting cables, remote controls, instructions manuals, etc.
  • We try to help everyone who brings an item. If participants bring multiple items (allowed), we can only work on one item at a time and may not be able to fix more than one item per person.
  • Our volunteer fixers will do their best to repair your item, but some repairs may be too complicated or require resources that aren't available at the event.
  • The event is free. There may be a wait depending on the number of repairs.

Contact

For more information contact us at RepairCafeGresham@gmail.com or 503-618-2694.

Repair PDX

Gresham Repair Cafe

Amphibian Survey Outdoor Volunteer Training: Sat, Feb 01, 2020 12PM-2PM

02/01/2020 - 12:00pm
02/01/2020 - 2:00pm
Etc/GMT-8
Amphibian Survey Outdoor Volunteer Training: Sat, Feb 01, 2020 12PM-2PM. Restoring Our Habitat. Info here!

Restoring Our Habitat

When: Sat, Feb 01, 2020 12PM-2PM
Where: Kelly Creek Pond
at the corner of SE Eagle Lane and SE Woodland Way
Get Map!

The City's Natural Resources Program is hosting an amphibian egg mass survey as a part of a regional effort to track the Pacific chorus frog, northwestern salamander, long-toed salamander and northern red-legged frog.

Join us for Part 2 of the volunteer amphibian survey training. This outdoor training teaches:

  • How to identify an egg mass
  • Survey techniques
  • Field methods

Gear will be provided. Wear weather-appropriate clothing.

An outdoor training is mandatory for anyone that wants to participate in surveys. If this date does not work for you, contact Marissa Eckman at Marissa.Eckman@GreshamOregon.gov

RSVP today

Read more about the amphibian surveys project

Syndicate content